Asking Better Questions

flickr photo by Steve Corey http://flickr.com/photos/stevecorey/20177350301 shared under a Creative Commons (BY-NC-ND) license

flickr photo by Steve Corey http://flickr.com/photos/stevecorey/20177350301 shared under a Creative Commons (BY-NC-ND) license 

Judge a man by his questions rather than by his answers. – Voltaire

Over at informED, writer Saga Briggs explores ways to ask better questions of ourselves. Suggestions include replace mission statements with questions and recognize and confront your biases.

“There’s plenty of literature on how to ask other people questions, but what about directing questions to ourselves? We can ask our students all the tricky questions we can think of, hoping to boost their critical thinking skills, but the ability to ask questions oneself–rather than just answering them–separates true learners from the rest.

Of course, this is similar to something like the Socratic method, where a series of questions help you reveal what you think about an argument or idea. Regardless of how you approach it, the end goal is to learn to think critically and analyze everything. As we’ve seen before, it’s important to always ask yourself why something is important and how it connects to things to you already know. As you do that, you train your brain to make connections between ideas and think critically about more information you come across.”

Read the entire piece, including 12 tips, here

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Recommended Blog ~ Justwondering musings of a passionate inquirer

Photo Credit: Some rights reserved by bogdog Dan via Flicker

For those of you grappling with ways to incorporate inquiry into your lessons and units, I highly recommend Kath Murdoch‘s excellent blog, Justwondering, musings of a passionate inquirer.

You can learn about her phases of inquiry here.   Kath is also active on Twitter. You can follow here tweets here.