How Harnessing the Positive Side of Stress Can Change Student Mindsets

flickr photo by racka_abe https://flickr.com/photos/racka/330343546 shared under a Creative Commons (BY) license

This new MindShift piece by Katrina Schwartz outlines the advantages of talking about the positive aspects stress with students.

“Carol Dweck’s work on growth mindset and its power to help people view challenges as opportunities to improve has helped many students understand their beliefs about themselves. When empowered with the understanding that intelligence is malleable, students can develop how they approach school and life. But the revelations around mindsets don’t end there — they apply to other areas of education, including how students view and react to stress.

There is a lot of research about how stress negatively impacts health, cognitive functioning and self-control, but less often discussed are how those findings change when people see their stress as a positive motivator. “In a number of situations, accepting and embracing the stress instead of trying to calm down helped students to do better,” said Kelly McGonigal, a health psychologist and lecturer at Stanford University at a Learning and the Brain conference on mindsets.”  Read the rest of the post here.

Carol Dweck’s TED Talk: The Power of Believing You Can Improve

From TED:

“Carol Dweck researches “growth mindset” — the idea that we can grow our brain’s capacity to learn and to solve problems. In this talk, she describes two ways to think about a problem that’s slightly too hard for you to solve. Are you not smart enough to solve it … or have you just not solved it yet? A great introduction to this influential field.” read more here.

Professor Sugata Mitra & the Hole in the Wall Project

Photo Credit: Claudio.Ar via Compfight cc

Have you ever heard of the hole in the wall project? It’s an amazing story of technology, perseverance and motivation.

From Edutopia by Sugata Mitra Professor of Education Technology, Newcastle University:

“In early 1999, some colleagues and I sunk a computer into the opening of a wall near our office in Kalkaji, New Delhi. The area was located in an expansive slum, with desperately poor people struggling to survive. The screen was visible from the street, and the PC was available to anyone who passed by. The computer had online access and a number of programs that could be used, but no instructions were given for its use.

What happened next astonished us. Children came running out of the nearest slum and glued themselves to the computer. They couldn’t get enough. They began to click and explore. They began to learn how to use this strange thing. A few hours later, a visibly surprised Vivek said the children were actually surfing the Web.” Read more at Edutopia here.

Skip ahead to 7:25 to hear Sugata Mitra speak about the Hole in the Wall experiments.